7 months in S.A.

Wow! I can’t believe I’ve lived in South America for a total of 7 months.

. . .

Half a year of living on another continent.
Half a year of learning another language.
Half a year of living in another culture.

. . .

It’s crazy to think about all the things I’ve done / learned in the past 7 months.
And, I couldn’t possibly explain them all in one post.
So, instead, here’s a list of 7 things I learned during my experience living in South America for 7 months:

1. This first one’s obvious: I couldn’t live in South America without learning Spanish!
I’ve learned a lot of Spanish, and realized that I love learning languages!
See post: Foreign Language Classes Abroad!

2. I learned a lot about budget traveling, and how to budget with foreign currency.
See post: Budget Travel Tip #1!

3. I learned how to successfully, and happily spend the holidays while solo traveling abroad.
See post: Abroad for the holidays!

4. I learned a lot about Patience.
So much so, that I think it might be a separate post. Coming soon! πŸ˜‰

5. I learned how to be my own best friend.
See post: Solo Travel Tip #1

6. I learned how to step out of my comfort zone more, and get the most out of every experience.
See post: Fear is Calling

7. And, lastly, I learned a bunch of other random things, like what I want to do with my life.
See post: 2019 resolutions

. . . 

And, if you want to read more about my experiences while
living in South America,
check out the following links:

Living in Chile! πŸ‡¨πŸ‡±

Living in Argentina! πŸ‡¦πŸ‡·


Thanks for reading!
I hope this post inspired you to travel, & step out of your comfort zone because it’s truly the best decision you will ever make.
And, although, traveling comes with ups and downs, one thing is for sure, I don’t regret one minute of my time abroad.

-LiveForAdventure! 😊

Adulting / Living Abroad

There’s a lot to learn how to do all over again.

. . .

It doesn’t matter if you were a pro at all those things in your home country because everything will be different in a foreign country.

Yes, there will be similarities, and you will learn the differences quickly. But, you will still need to learn the best place to grocery shop, the best method of transportation to get around (bus, subway, taxi), and the currency (so you know when something is overpriced).

And, on top of discovering all those things, you will need to learn a foreign language.

AND, while you are learning ALL that, you also need to deal with homesickness and culture shock (at least for the first few months).

Now, I’m not saying all this to scare you. I personally have been loving my experience living abroad. I’m telling you all this so you know what’s coming: A LOT OF WORK AND DEDICATION! But, it’s 100% worth it.

Yes, there will be ups and downs. There will be days where you won’t want to speak the language (you’ll get tired of needing to train your brain in a foreign language everyday). There will be days where you’ll just want to do nothing. But, those days are the best because they will teach you the most.
If you power through those days, you will realize how worth it, it is, to learn to adult/live in a foreign country.
It will make it that much easier for your return to your home country. Adulting/living in a foreign country is an amazing, life-changing experience.

It really is LIFE-CHANGING because after you live in a foreign country for more than 2 or 3 months, your view of everything changes. But, the only way to understand this life-changing experience is to live it yourself!
So, step out of your comfort zone & live this amazing experience!

Thanks for reading!

I hope this inspired you to step out of your comfort zone and change your perspective!

-LiveForAdventure! 😊


P.S. I just completed my second months of living abroad in Buenos Aires, Argentina!
CHECK OUT THE LINK BELOW TO SEE SOME OF MY ADVENTURES, WHILE LEARNING NEW THINGS AND LIVING A LIFE-CHANGING EXPERIENCE:


https://youtu.be/G5h00mML3RY

Santiago, Chile – Day 1Β 

So, I’ve officially boarded the plane to Chile. And, all I want to do right now is sleep because it’s currently 01:00 (please consider this when reading the following post)

For those of you interested, I’m flying in a Boeing 777-300ER. And, it’s a completely full flight. But, even though I will be squished in this plane for 10 hours, I am absolutely pumped to land in Chile. Right now, I’m really tired, but I know that once I land, I will catch a second wind of energy. 

3 hours later…

I just woke up to the sound of my ear buds playing Spanish music and the smell of breakfast coming. These sounds and smells made me even more excited, (but also a little nervous) for the adventure ahead. I’m excited (and nervous) to see if I learned enough Spanish, and to see what it’s like to live in another country. 

2 hours later… (landed)

Well. I’m here, standing on the porch of my hostal room. And, can I just say that as soon as I landed, culture shock (& the heat) hit me like a brick. 

I mean, I’ve been preparing for this trip for a while, but still, nothing could have prepared me for this surprise for the following reasoms:

1- I’m coming from winter weather (-10) to Mediterranean summer weather (+30).

2- My brain didn’t realize how fast people actually speak Spanish. They understand me and then think I’m fluent, so they speak faster which makes all my conversations lasts maximum 5 minutes. 

. . . 

So, it’s 22:00 on my first day (technically half day) here in Chile. (Landed at 13:00 & didn’t get to my hostal until 14:30). And, since then, I’ve just been walking around discovering everything I can, until I crash for the night. 

Seriously though, I am SO tired (12 hours of flying later). I was ready to go to bed at 20:00, but I’m trying to get over jetlag as quickly as possible because I have a busy and exciting 3 months ahead of me. 

And, even though all I did today was walk around and visit the local grocery store, I feel like I already learned a lot about the culture.

. . . 

Well, that’s my journey here and my first thoughts during my first day in Santiago, Chile.  I’m going to sleep now, so tomorrow can be an even better day. 

Β‘Buenos Noches!

P.S. I don’t know if I’ll actually continue writing these everyday day with day 1, day 2 and so on; but for now, let’s say so. 

Thanks for reading! 

-LiveForAdventure! πŸ™‚

No right or wrong…

There’s no right or wrong in the world, just different!

. . .

What you know in your country is, & will always be, different than what someone else knows in their country! 

We all need to learn this and accept this truth because it will never change! 

All cultures will remain different forever and I think that’s an amazing thing! 

Think about it!

If we were all the same, the world would be boring, & we would have no need to travel! (That’s a statement I never want to say/hear) 

. . .

The different culture in the world are the reason that I love traveling. It’s an exciting and interesting experience & adventure; To learn that the way I see something isn’t necessarily the right way because people have different views about the exact same thing! 

For example:

Think about something small like paper.
In some countries, it’s barely ever used because everything is done online, and in other countries, it’s all they use because the internet is reserved for certain important things! 

I admit this might not be the best example, but the point I’m trying to make is that paper is probably one of the most basic necessities that can be found throughout the world (for work and school), yet, it is seen completely differently in different countries/cultures! 

However, if you want, you can use the same example with water (that’s a little more complex), but it still has the same outcome! 

 So, always remember that you don’t know everything because the world is huge! 

Thanks for reading! I hope this post inspired you to not judge the culture of a country just because you don’t like it and/or agree with it! 


-LiveForAdventure! πŸ™‚

The Grocery Store

The most interesting & culturally diverse place in the world! 

. . .

Seriously though, grocery stores really are the most interesting and culturally diverse places in the world! 

See it for yourself, next time you are in a new country.

Just go visit the local grocery store because you can learn a lot about a culture just by visiting a local grocery store.

. . .

Grocery stores are quite different in every country for multiple reasons. 

Here are a few differences that I’ve noticed:

1- Currency!

Visiting a local grocery store is an easy way to learn the worth of the currency; The different currency means that the prices look different (this helps you better understand the exchange rate).

2- Set up!

Each country has a different view of which foods go where; Based on popularity of that item in the country, and the size of the store area. This also differs between outside markets & inside stores because some countries only sell fruits and vegetables in outside markets while the other items are inside a general store, and vice versa.

3- Items!

Visiting a local grocery store is a great way to learn the popular local food items. It also shows you new and/or different items that you might not find in your home country because grocery stores around the world carry different items that others wouldn’t have, based on; item availability in the country.

Those are just 3 of the main reasons why I love to visit local grocery stores in new countries because you can learn so much!

Grocery stores are kinda like free museums; except better because you actually get to experience the culture, while being completely submerged in it.

And, you get to see new things that you wouldn’t normally see in a normal grocery store (one that you’re accustomed to)

What you know is not all there is in the world!

There’s so much out there to learn about & explore! 

So, next time you visit a new country, visit a local grocery store and take a closer look at those 3 things because I promise, you will already feel like you know a lot about the culture of the country. 

Thanks for reading! I hope this post inspired & encouraged your wanderlust!

P.S. If you notice another cultural difference in grocery stores; Please comment below, I would love to learn more! 

 

-LiveForAdventure! πŸ™‚