Home after living abroad!?

Coming back home after living abroad for a time is not easy!

. . .

Yup, Reverse Culture Shock! It’s a real thing!

. . .

So, I’ve only been back from Chile for about a week now and the only way I can describe coming home after living abroad for a time is: “weird” & “confused”.
In Chile, everything felt so normal. Living there just felt like normal living, but now everything I do here seems weird and different.
For example: It’s dark outside right now (@8pm which is 2hours earlier than I’m used to, but that’s not the point). So, it’s dark and I just turned on the lights in my room and it actually made the room so much brighter, like almost unbearably bright. It’s like I wasn’t even used to light anymore (except for natural sunlight, I saw that everydayโ˜บ).
But, why did this light just give me a headache?
-“confusing”
Or, another example: I went to the grocery store the other day (to get one thing) and I could barely find it (it took me a good 10minutes of wandering around before I found it). Everything seemed to be in a different place then what I became used to in Chile.
And, that’s not all.
I think one other thing that makes coming home even “weirder” and more “confusing” is that now I’m comparing things from Chile to here, but I didn’t compare things from here in Chile.
So, why am I doing it now?
-“weird”

. . .

Yes, home feels familiar and looks pretty much the same, but there are a few things that are different that you can’t understand why they changed, but they just did. In the (what felt like a short amount of) time that you were away, so much has changed, yet somehow, everything is still the same.
It’s pretty hard to describe this “factor” because the things that seem like they changed only seem different to you because your brain has “evolved” (it’s like it’s playing tricks on you). It’s tricking into thinking home is different because you are no longer fully consumed by every little thing that happens at home because you’ve seen things/problems much bigger.

Your new perspective is showing you not to consume yourself with little things at home because the world is so much bigger than your little problems and there are many more & bigger problems in the world!

Culture shock, or even Reverse culture shock, is not something that should stop you from traveling!
I think culture shock and reverse culture shock are important things to notice and feel when traveling because they make you more aware of yourself and the world around you!

Here’s a picture that I think well-describes culture shock and reverse culture shock:
#9 should make you want to travel (it does for me)!

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Thanks for reading!

-LiveForAdventure! ๐Ÿ™‚


P.S. Here’s the link to my other posts about my experiences in Chile: My Trip to Chile! ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฑ
And, here’s the link to my YouTube videos about my adventures in Chile: My Trip to Chile! (Playlist)

Santiago, Chile – Day 1ย 

So, I’ve officially boarded the plane to Chile. And, all I want to do right now is sleep because it’s currently 01:00 (please consider this when reading the following post)

For those of you interested, I’m flying in a Boeing 777-300ER. And, it’s a completely full flight. But, even though I will be squished in this plane for 10 hours, I am absolutely pumped to land in Chile. Right now, I’m really tired, but I know that once I land, I will catch a second wind of energy. 

3 hours later…

I just woke up to the sound of my ear buds playing Spanish music and the smell of breakfast coming. These sounds and smells made me even more excited, (but also a little nervous) for the adventure ahead. I’m excited (and nervous) to see if I learned enough Spanish, and to see what it’s like to live in another country. 

2 hours later… (landed)

Well. I’m here, standing on the porch of my hostal room. And, can I just say that as soon as I landed, culture shock (& the heat) hit me like a brick. 

I mean, I’ve been preparing for this trip for a while, but still, nothing could have prepared me for this surprise for the following reasoms:

1- I’m coming from winter weather (-10) to Mediterranean summer weather (+30).

2- My brain didn’t realize how fast people actually speak Spanish. They understand me and then think I’m fluent, so they speak faster which makes all my conversations lasts maximum 5 minutes. 

. . . 

So, it’s 22:00 on my first day (technically half day) here in Chile. (Landed at 13:00 & didn’t get to my hostal until 14:30). And, since then, I’ve just been walking around discovering everything I can, until I crash for the night. 

Seriously though, I am SO tired (12 hours of flying later). I was ready to go to bed at 20:00, but I’m trying to get over jetlag as quickly as possible because I have a busy and exciting 3 months ahead of me. 

And, even though all I did today was walk around and visit the local grocery store, I feel like I already learned a lot about the culture.

. . . 

Well, that’s my journey here and my first thoughts during my first day in Santiago, Chile.  I’m going to sleep now, so tomorrow can be an even better day. 

ยกBuenos Noches!

P.S. I don’t know if I’ll actually continue writing these everyday day with day 1, day 2 and so on; but for now, let’s say so. 

Thanks for reading! 

-LiveForAdventure! ๐Ÿ™‚

The Grocery Store

The most interesting & culturally diverse place in the world! 

. . .

Seriously though, grocery stores really are the most interesting and culturally diverse places in the world! 

See it for yourself, next time you are in a new country.

Just go visit the local grocery store because you can learn a lot about a culture just by visiting a local grocery store.

. . .

Grocery stores are quite different in every country for multiple reasons. 

Here are a few differences that I’ve noticed:

1- Currency!

Visiting a local grocery store is an easy way to learn the worth of the currency; The different currency means that the prices look different (this helps you better understand the exchange rate).

2- Set up!

Each country has a different view of which foods go where; Based on popularity of that item in the country, and the size of the store area. This also differs between outside markets & inside stores because some countries only sell fruits and vegetables in outside markets while the other items are inside a general store, and vice versa.

3- Items!

Visiting a local grocery store is a great way to learn the popular local food items. It also shows you new and/or different items that you might not find in your home country because grocery stores around the world carry different items that others wouldn’t have, based on; item availability in the country.

Those are just 3 of the main reasons why I love to visit local grocery stores in new countries because you can learn so much!

Grocery stores are kinda like free museums; except better because you actually get to experience the culture, while being completely submerged in it.

And, you get to see new things that you wouldn’t normally see in a normal grocery store (one that you’re accustomed to)

What you know is not all there is in the world!

There’s so much out there to learn about & explore! 

So, next time you visit a new country, visit a local grocery store and take a closer look at those 3 things because I promise, you will already feel like you know a lot about the culture of the country. 

Thanks for reading! I hope this post inspired & encouraged your wanderlust!

P.S. If you notice another cultural difference in grocery stores; Please comment below, I would love to learn more! 

 

-LiveForAdventure! ๐Ÿ™‚